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ISSUE ARCHIVES

SEPT/OCT 2000
Volume 43 /  Issue 1

IN THIS ISSUE
Project Articles
Grandfather Clock, Part 1
Gumball Machine
The Dancin’ Duck Puppet

DEPARTMENTS
Ask Smitty
Owner’s Gallery
Letters from Owners

Academy Notes
Frame & Raised Panel Construction
 
Find A Shopsmith Woodworking Academy Near You
 
Service Pointers
 
Safety Tips
Safety, A Matter of Self-Respect

SURF’S UP
Return of SPT stands?
Specials & Online Catalog
Links Worth Visiting
Find A Shopsmith
MARK V Demo Near You

FREE FROM SHOPSMITH
Free Woodworking Tips
Request Accessory Catalog
Request MARK V Video
Request MARK V Information Package

FEEDBACK
Subscribe/Renew
Contacting Shopsmith

Copyright 2000.
Shopsmith, Inc.
All Rights Reserved

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Just
Ask
Smitty

ASK SMITTY!
Here are the questions . . . and SMITTY’S answers for this issue!

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No woodworker (except SMITTY, of course) has ALL the answers. From time-to-time, everyone hits a snag, trying to figure out some sort of in-shop problem.
 
Don’t worry. SMITTY can help.  Just use the special e-mail link directly below to send your questions to SMITTY. He’ll do his best to get back to you soon, with the answers to those questions.

End grain chatter on the lathe
 
From Dick Nangle of South Dennis, MA:
 
I’m having trouble hollowing out a long wooden (rock maple) cylinder mounted on a faceplate. No matter what cutting tool I use — even at the slowest speed on my MARK V — I’m getting violent chatter as I try this operation.
 
The easiest way to start hollowing a turning is with a large diameter drill bit mounted in your drill chuck on the Shopsmith Tailstock Chuck Arbor. Drill at the slowest possible speed. A few tips on removing the remaining stock:  The cutting edge of your roundnose scraping tool must cut exactly on center  and parallel to the floor. The tool will work best when ground to an 85-degree angle (see Figure 1).
For maximum support, the tool rest must be kept as close as possible to the stock. Finally, the stock must be absolutely flat against the faceplate with at least 1-1/2-inch of mounting screw penetrating into the stock to hold it firmly.

The Greek key
 
From John Black of Valdese, NC:
 
I have a great deal of interest in classic furniture. The spiral turning and Greek key are both integral parts of many authentic reproductions. My attempts to recreate these designs have been messy and unacceptable. Can you give me any ideas?
 
Being part of classic (pre-Industrial Age) furniture design, woodworking trim such as the Greek key (see Figure 2) and the spiral turning were, by necessity, done by hand. The only way to authentically reproduce them today is still by hand.
You’ll need a set of sharp, high-quality carving chisels in order to get the best results when doing this meticulous work. Patient practice on scrap wood is the key to success. 

Continue . . .

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Figure 1

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Figure 2

Have a Question? E-Mail Smitty Today. . .